NYAS: Fringe Benefits for Class Taking Scholarships

Posted by on Oct 30, 2013

NYAS: Fringe Benefits for Class Taking Scholarships

In this new segment, we’re taking a look at the weekly weird scholarship opportunities. In NYAS, or Not Your Average Student, we will introduce a new student scholarship thats been designed to support students looking to attend accredited universities. The Eileen J. Garrett Scholarship benefits students looking to study the (extremely) soft science of parapsychology. Award: $3000. Not enough to cover tuition, but that will cover housing and food at most universities, or in your case, ghosthunting tools. Deadline: August 1st, yearly. Requirements: Your original writings on parapsychology research, also letters of reference on your experiences in the field of parapsychology.   These opportunities are good for more than just future ghosthunters – they guarantee a tiny pool of applicants (and therefore increase your odds of getting the scholarship), recognition, and finally, a disposable amount of income to cover your prerequisites in college. This may not seem like a big deal, but getting any  scholarship is a positive, and it’s free money: even if you don’t graduate with the “intended” parapsychology degree, you will not be indebted to the group. And before you think about feeling bad for taking the rare private organization handout remember: this isn’t just good will. Companies get tax breaks and government benefits for handing out scholarships like this...

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How to Cut Class Convincingly

Posted by on Oct 11, 2013

How to Cut Class Convincingly

Playing hookie has never been so believable. Students constantly skip classes in college, but few take the time to do so with conviction. We’ve gathered some top tips here from our own student base, as well as UMWBullet.com’s Landon James, to help you get out of your schedule without the consequences of the professor’s disbelief and passive-aggressive grading. Death. No sacred cows here: if a friend or family member has recently or historically died, or you can put on a good grieving face, this will keep you out of a few due dates and gain you some sympathy. The Bullet ranks this excuse a 10 out of 10. Ipecac. This drug will make you sick within several minutes of taking it. Doctors use it to remove poisons from the system, so the fireworks it sends of will surely make it obvious you can’t take whatever exam, test, speech or lab you didn’t study for. Just don’t mind being remembered as the guy who lost his lunch in Astronomy class. Concussion. Faking a concussion is the most foolproof way of getting out of class, being late, or having not completed your homework. Signs of concussion? Looking tired, wearing sunglasses, acting a bit wobbly and hungover. Throw the appearance of a headache and getting a few words mixed up, and your poor attendance is sure to be believable. Migraine. One-third of Americans suffer from headaches that render them unable to attend class. You don’t need a doctor’s note, and if they ask you why you didn’t get one, just say the meds don’t work. Go into graphic detail about how sick to your stomach you were to really stop them from wanting to ask questions. Other tips are available at UMW Bullet>>...

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Online Degree Programs: How to Pick a Program that Pays You Back

Posted by on Aug 26, 2013

Online Degree Programs: How to Pick a Program that Pays You Back

Choosing to earn your degree online is a big decision. What’s even bigger is choosing which program to enroll in. With hundreds of schools offering a wide variety of majors and programs, it can be overwhelming to choose one. The good news is, it’s not impossible, and we can help you decide on the right program for your future. We put together a checklist to help you narrow down your options and make a good decision. 1. Accreditation: The first step in choosing a degree program is to research the program to be sure it is accredited and accepted by other schools and potential employers. A basic search on any search engine will provide a list of accredited online schools. This step is key to your future success, so be sure to do your research. A wrong decision that could cost you thousands of dollars. 2. Teaching Methods: Next, research what platforms the particular school of interest utilizes. Do they offer video chat sessions? Are tests and quizzes taken in person or at a lab? Do you need certain technology to gain access to classes? Make sure you answer all of these questions before taking the plunge. 3. Check in with the Alumni Most importantly, try to speak with graduates of that particular school or program. How did they like it? Did they feel like their money was well-spent? Do they feel like their money could have gone to a better cause? The last thing you want is to invest your money in a degree that wastes your valuable time and money. Do a background check on the institutions you’re considering via these three steps, and save yourself in the long...

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Ten reasons you should let someone take your online class

Posted by on Jul 17, 2013

So you’re debating outsourcing your online class work to a company like Online Class Help. You don’t want to do your class work, but you don’t want to be labeled “a cheater.” We understand, but just because you outsource your homework doesn’t make you a cheater. In fact in the real world it would make you a good employee because you know how to delegate work to someone who has more time or is better at it. Here is a list of reasons why you should let someone else take your online class. 1. Because you won’t use it someday. Do you really think you are going to be using Astronomy in everyday life? Only if you’re an astronomy professor or you work at the planetarium. 2. Because you will get a good grade. When you have a professor or expert take your class you’re obviously going to get a good grade. 3. Because you will not have to drop the class. Since you will be getting a good grade you will not have to drop the class. YAY! 4. Because you have better things to do. You have a job(s), three other classes and a social life. How are you going to do all this work? You don’t and anyway, those other things are more important. 5. Because they are time consuming. Online classes are more time consuming than on-campus classes. Do you really have time for time consuming? I don’t think so. 6. Because it’s less expensive than having to retake the class. Think about the cost to pay someone to take your online class versus the time and money it takes to retake a class. I think we know the most cost effective solution here – pay someone to take your online class. 7. Because no one will even know. If you’re worried about someone finding out, don’t be. No one has to know except you and the company. 8. Because you will procrastinate. It’s inevitable that you will procrastinate so sidestep this problem by outsourcing your class. 9. Because you don’t want to be isolated to your computer. Online classes isolate you in your room and chain you to your computer. How are you going to have a social life when this class is your life? 10. Because it isn’t cheating. Don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it as...

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Is an online class more important than experience?

Posted by on Jun 21, 2013

“Would you want a doctor who cheated his or her way through medical school?” This question was posed in response to a blog post we wrote earlier this week called Why schools should relax about cheating. The answer is no, we would most certainly not want a doctor who cheated his or her way through medical school (although I do know a few veteran nurses who slept their way through school); and so, we are most definitely not suggesting that they do. With that being said, we do not believe every undergraduate class in college will make or break a student’s ability to do great work in the professional world. Do journalism majors really need to learn calculus? Even so that still may not be an excellent reason for a student to get help with their online class; nevertheless, I do have a reason, which I believe to be a valid one. According to Bonnie Kerrigan Snyder, author of The New College Reality, “Today nearly 20 percent of the unemployed in the United States have college degrees while less than half of all college graduates under age twenty-five are working jobs that require them.” Kerrigan also reported, based on statistics from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, “There are currently over 482,000 customer service representatives with college degrees, along with 317,000 waiters and waitresses. There are over 80,000 bartenders and 18,000 parking lot attendants – part of a total of 17 million Americans with college degrees working at jobs that do not require college-level skills.” What do these statistics have to do with cheating? A lot. In Fall 2011, there were 21.6 million undergraduate students and 2.9 million graduate students enrolled in U.S. colleges, but, according to the Economic Policy Institute, only an estimated 2 million did internships. Most students don’t have time for and/or cannot afford to undertake an internship, and experience is what employers value most. They do not care about GPAs, majors and the like. Never mind the fact that students learn more in the workplace than they do in classes. So yes, while a doctor cheating his way through medical school is not good, an undergraduate having someone take an online class, which has little to do with his or her profession, is okay in our book because it provides them with time to gain something much more valuable – identity capital. If you’re having trouble...

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Why schools should relax about cheating

Posted by on Jun 19, 2013

“It’s completely ridiculous that schools are so uptight about cheating because what schools call cheating is what people in the work world call effective workplace behavior.” Penelope Trunk, career specialist and founder of three startups, wrote this in an unconventional blog post on cheating earlier this month. At first glance, this headline may appear outrageous to professors, parents and those in academia, but after they read it they may question their conventional outlook on cheating because she backs up her statement with a lot of great reasons. According to an Academic Cheating Fact Sheet by noncheating.org, while about 20 percent of college students admitted to cheating in high school during the 1940’s, today between 75 percent and 98 percent of college students surveyed each year report having cheated in high school. I am sure the numbers only increase when students get to college because there just isn’t enough time in a day to attend classes, do homework, go to your internship, work a part-time job and then study for all your exams crammed into one week. My opinion is backed up by news headlines about large-scale cheating scandals “at some of the nation’s most competitive schools, like Stuyvesant High School in Manhattan, the Air Force Academy and, most recently, Harvard.” Researchers believe cheating has become more widespread due to technology, increased pressure and competition among Generation Y, but I believe cheating has increased due generation differences. Today’s youth grew up with computers, smart phones and tablets; we were groomed to be time-efficient multi-taskers. We never had to wonder the answer to a question because we used the Internet or a mentor to answer it as soon as it popped into our head. In the work world this is called resourcefulness. I do not think more students are cheating because they do not have integrity or because they are dishonest people but rather because they are resourceful generation who collaborates with one another to save time and get things done. Do you think cheating will help students succeed in the working world? Why or why not? Tell us in your comments below. P.S. If you’re one of those busy students looking to save some time visit onlineclasshelp.com for help....

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