Dominating Finals: It’s Not All About Studying

Posted by on Nov 8, 2013

Dominating Finals: It’s Not All About Studying

It’s November – Thanksgiving holidays and subsequent cramming are just a few weeks away. We’ve been hunting for the best ways to get the most out of your diminishing time… So we turned to those who fight their way through one of the most rigorous programs offered in American education: law students. Need real formulas for working smarter and playing harder? Here is the best way to prep for finals, take your finals, and get ahead of your class in the little ways that speak volumes. The best part? Your professor would NEVER recommend these. That’s how you know they’re good. Our top 3 favs: 1. DO outline – at least a little bit. That way, when you have some days but are missing others, “you won’t come off as a complete mooch when you ask someone to ‘compare’ outlines.” DON’T post facebook requests for someone else’s outline. That makes you look like a loser and charity case. 2. DO go to classes leading up to exams. These are the ones professors pay close attention to, and get little thrills putting on exams. DON’T worry about the professor calling on you. Yeah, you may not have the answer, but it’s November. Look like an idiot in front the half of the class that showed up, and most are too busy hallucinating on Redbull hangovers, looking like an whiz is more likely to land you a top rank on your friend’s hit list than your professor’s s/hit list. 3. DO go out for some drinks – ESPECIALLY on Thursday or Friday. You need to relax, so scoring and getting your drink on are top tools for keeping you on task to power through the volley of test-taking you’re about to take DON’T “Go out for a few drinks” – taking time off from studying to “reward” yourself or “study at the bar” is an impossible joke of multi-tasking that leads to rejection from your peers who are ACTUALLY trying to have a drink, and most likely party fever that lands you in hangover hell on Sunday. The porcelain gods will not bless you on finals day, friend. Those are just a few of the great tips we learned from D-Man on Post Grad Problems. Read the rest here, they’re worth their weight in Vyvanse. ...

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Paw & Order: Concordia University

Posted by on Oct 28, 2013

Paw & Order: Concordia University

Today, we are here to explore the crimes of the desperate education system. Colleges are constantly judging, reviewing and weeding out applicants; unfortunately, these “qualified” evaluators often break the rules that they claim to be enforcing. We know “higher education” to be an imperfect, negligent system rife with faults; unfortunately there is not always accountability at the top of the food chain. Who are the watchdogs of the University? They are: real dogs. Exemplary citizens have challenged the low standards and inept screening methods of so-called “higher” institutions. They leapt into the university system, and graduated with high marks. These top individuals deserve recognition beyond diploma. Time and again, Man’s Best Friend has stood at the front line to take the bullet when we could not fight the battle for justice in education. That’s right. Dogs are dealing with the pressures of college, just like you. Don’t believe it? Check out this article from the AP. First citizen, protecting our learning: John I. Rocko, Graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice from Concordia College in 2007. This police dog has a degree from the same University as his owner, Police Chief John McGwire. The undercover canine received a diploma in criminology, as well as a subpoena to give his testimony in the case against Concordia in Ohio. What does that mean for us? This institution will have to re-evaluate it’s scam, and improve the value of it’s education to the students. Thank you, John Rocko. And congratulations on using your criminology degree to it’s fullest potential, putting away the baddies! Thus, this post is dedicated to the famous educated canine, the Professor Dog. Urban Dictionary defines Professor Dog as:  Professor Dog “The famous UC Barkeley teacher that is famous for teaching Ecodogmics AND Algebark. He is also a dog.”   There are many other animals that have helped May you learn from his adventures, improve from his lessons, and keep a sense of humor in all your college endeavors....

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Should a college class be brought into court?

Posted by on Jul 4, 2013

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy   Could taking a specific college class haunt you in the future? For George Zimmerman, the man on trial for second-degree murder of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Orlando Florida, it has. Zimmerman’s attorneys are pleading self-defense in the trial, and this week Zimmerman’s former professor took the stand to discuss the criminal litigation course Zimmerman received an ‘A’ in at Seminole State College. Prosecutors wanted to enlighten jurors about this because last year, in an interview with Fox News, Zimmerman said he was unaware of the Stand Your Ground Law in Florida. According to Zimmerman’s college professor self-defense was a largely discussed in the course. “I wanted to teach the class from a practical standpoint where these students can really relate and take something from it and apply it to their own lives. You know with Florida and other states, they have what’s called the Stand Your Ground Law,” U.S. Army Capt. Alexis Francisco Carter said of why he taught his students about Florida’s expansive self-defense law, which allows individuals to defend themselves with deadly force if they feel their lives are being threatened. To be honest, I have not been following the Trayvon Martin case; and so, I have no strong opinions on whether Mr. Zimmerman is guilty of second-degree murder or not, but I am interested with the fact that prosecutors brought a college class into the courtroom. While I understand why prosecutors would want to point out that he lied about knowing about the Stand Your Ground law, I do not see why his knowledge of the law would make a difference in the case. What do you think about prosecutors bringing a college class into a second-degree murder court case? Tell us in your comments. We’re dying to know what you...

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