The Best Study Music (AKA Thank God It’s Not Mozart)

Posted by on Dec 12, 2013

The Best Study Music (AKA Thank God It’s Not Mozart)

In honor of all national finals week(s), also known as Open Season for your predatory, student-hunting professors, we’re challenging the trends, myths and science behind listening to music while you study. This usually goes one of two ways: 1) “Shut up and Study: no music will help you, you lazy good-for-nothing!” if you’re used to hearing that, you’re mom must be a b*tch too, in which case, I’m sorry for you. 2) “Mozart will make you smart!” Ooooh, crank up that sweet NPR! Score some serious cool points with your friends! (Just kidding. REALLY kidding.) We’re here to bury these stupid quotes you’ve been hearing all your life, and offer you REAL music that follows the rules but won’t kill your buzz, fun or reputation (if you sell it the right way at least). What scientists have discovered is that: Music boosts productivity, and improves your mood. So rule #1 is completely off-base. LISTEN to your music. Well, maybe not YOUR music. But we’ll get to that in part II. The style of Classical music is not what aids your thinking. It’s just the BPM: While some Baroque music has been proven to set a good, productive mood, the real trick behind music is the BPM, or beats per minute. A recent study by Spotify showed that students perform better academically if they listen to music in the 60+ BPM, to put the brain in a learning state. Supposedly, the magic number (in the 50-80 range at least) is required to get the brain revving, but not to the point of distraction, especially where thinking and creativity are involved. So if Vivaldi’s 4 Seasons doesn’t pump you up, that’s ok. There are plenty of cooler, less tired and outdated alternatives that won’t leave you seeming the stuffy nerdwad who studies like it’s his job. The best alternatives to your current playlist: Classical, but Cool Want new music, but believe in the classical method? Here’s an option for you. The Vitamin String Quartet does classical/string quartet covers of pop music. Anything from Red Hot Chili Peppers, Muse, Linkin Park, the Goo Goo Dolls. The Ambient Approach Need to de-stress? If it’s finals week, you probably are pulling your hair out over that-essay-you-forgot-when-you-have-2-exams-tomorrow in classes you couldn’t care less about. Take a chill pill with ambient/chillout/IDM style music. IDM was originally designed to help hard partiers and dancers relax and recover between long rave sessions,...

Read More

Dominating Finals: It’s Not All About Studying

Posted by on Nov 8, 2013

Dominating Finals: It’s Not All About Studying

It’s November – Thanksgiving holidays and subsequent cramming are just a few weeks away. We’ve been hunting for the best ways to get the most out of your diminishing time… So we turned to those who fight their way through one of the most rigorous programs offered in American education: law students. Need real formulas for working smarter and playing harder? Here is the best way to prep for finals, take your finals, and get ahead of your class in the little ways that speak volumes. The best part? Your professor would NEVER recommend these. That’s how you know they’re good. Our top 3 favs: 1. DO outline – at least a little bit. That way, when you have some days but are missing others, “you won’t come off as a complete mooch when you ask someone to ‘compare’ outlines.” DON’T post facebook requests for someone else’s outline. That makes you look like a loser and charity case. 2. DO go to classes leading up to exams. These are the ones professors pay close attention to, and get little thrills putting on exams. DON’T worry about the professor calling on you. Yeah, you may not have the answer, but it’s November. Look like an idiot in front the half of the class that showed up, and most are too busy hallucinating on Redbull hangovers, looking like an whiz is more likely to land you a top rank on your friend’s hit list than your professor’s s/hit list. 3. DO go out for some drinks – ESPECIALLY on Thursday or Friday. You need to relax, so scoring and getting your drink on are top tools for keeping you on task to power through the volley of test-taking you’re about to take DON’T “Go out for a few drinks” – taking time off from studying to “reward” yourself or “study at the bar” is an impossible joke of multi-tasking that leads to rejection from your peers who are ACTUALLY trying to have a drink, and most likely party fever that lands you in hangover hell on Sunday. The porcelain gods will not bless you on finals day, friend. Those are just a few of the great tips we learned from D-Man on Post Grad Problems. Read the rest here, they’re worth their weight in Vyvanse. ...

Read More

More Gain, Less Pain: Earning the Best Associate Degree Online

Posted by on Oct 21, 2013

More Gain, Less Pain: Earning the Best Associate Degree Online

After reading an informative article by DegreeScape, we found it important to note that 4-year education is a long-term commitment with variable results as far as career success is concerned. Ultimately, you may just be getting a degree because you want to earn more money than you can without one. Four years is a long commitment, no matter your age. Graduating in just 2 years can give you the opportunity to earn more money than many bachelors degrees, and the limited time investment really sweetens the deal when planning out your future. What if you could do it all online? The following 5 career paths are all available online,  so you can take your classes, commute-free, and wind up with a career at the end of it. Some of these online class opportunities include: Registered Nurse Online Programs can be taken at Indiana State University and Concordia University; Web Developer Online Programs are available at Harvard’s Extension School and MOOCs; Electrical Engineering Online Degree can be earned online at Thomas Edison State College; Dental Hygienist Online Classes are available at East Tennessee State University and SUNY at Canton; Airplane Quality Control Inspector can be taken at Cowley College. All of these careers can earn an upwards of $56,000 to as much as $137,000 annually. For more information, read the fully-detailed article at  DegreeScape.com....

Read More

Remember Free Online Education? Check Out the Younger Perspective

Posted by on Oct 16, 2013

Remember Free Online Education? Check Out the Younger Perspective

We’re a big fan of free learning at Online Class Help. To us, it’s about more than just getting homework done, or getting classes out of the way. It’s exciting for students and adults to be able to receive free online education in subjects they might actually be interested in. The Young Turks of Youtube provide a younger perspective for current college students on how to enjoy the luxury of an education:...

Read More

MOOCs: The Adult Student Perspective

Posted by on Oct 9, 2013

MOOCs: The Adult Student Perspective

We’ve been talking about Free Online Classes offered at nationwide universities. Now, we’ve received some thoughts from the Adult Student perspective reveal that over half of the students for MOOCs are working professionals. We’ll do your homework for these online classes too, but we want to make sure you have the opportunity to learn. Here’s an overview of the original response from CNN and various professors and students who’ve taken the plunge into learning for learning’s sake....

Read More

How to Ace Your Admissions Essays

Posted by on Aug 24, 2013

How to Ace Your Admissions Essays

Unfortunately, not everyone can skip out on writing pesky admissions essays, even when applying to an online degree program. If you aren’t fully confident in your writing skills but want to wow the admissions officers at your school of choice, you’re in luck. We have the run down on everything you need to ace your admissions essays and attend the school of your dreams. First and foremost, you should always write as if you are talking to the reader, rather than writing something down. Writing tone can often come off awkward or choppy, but if you keep this tip in mind, you’re writing will sound fluid and thoughtful. Next, when diving into your topic, offer up an interesting story about your life, and make sure your story has a specific moral or message. This will allow readers to understand who you are and level with you and your work. Also, it is important to avoid cliches or generalities when writing your essay. Instead of saying that you are a “hardworking student,” you should demonstrate an example of your hardworking nature. It is always better to show than to tell. Lastly, triple checking for any grammatical or spelling mistakes is very important. You don’t want readers to get distracted by improper grammar, otherwise your message will get lost. Follow these simple steps to writing success and you will ace your...

Read More